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International Workshop on: Towards Socially Just and Sustainable Fisheries: ICSF Workshop on Implementing the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines)
  • :2014
  • :98
  • :978 93 80802 33 6
Abstract

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON

Towards Socially Just and Sustainable Fisheries: ICSF Workshop on Implementing
the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries
in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines)

Report

This publication is a report of the proceedings of the ICSF Pondy Workshop, which focused on the FAO’s Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines). The workshop brought together 71 participants from 20 countries representing civil society organizations, governments, FAO, academia and fishworker organizations from both the marine and inland fisheries sectors.

This report will be found useful for fishworker organizations, researchers, policymakers, members of civil society and anyone interested in small-scale fisheries, food security and poverty eradication.

Annexure 3

Annexure 3


Report on Puducherry and Nagapattinam Field Trips: Coastal Commons and Fish Marketing

The field trip to Puducherry was organized around the theme of “coastal commons and fish marketing”. The 20 participants started out at 5:45 a.m. from the workshop venue to the mouth of the Ariyankuppam River. On the way, Aurofilio Schiavina from the NGO PondyCAN joined the participants. Standing on the beach to the south of the river, Aurofilio explained that in 1986 a commercial harbour was built at the river mouth, in spite of the findings of a Central Water Power and Research Station (CWPRS) study carried out at the time noting that the harbour’s breakwaters would disrupt the natural movement of sand (the longshore littoral drift) along the coast and thereby cause erosion of the coast. The commercial harbour was never functional however, and therefore served as a fishing harbour. In the years since, as predicted, large-scale erosion was seen north of the harbour, depriving Puducherry town of its beach. A sand-bypass system was installed wherein sand would be pumped via a pipe to the north side of the river mouth. This was seldom used. Only rusted pipes and broken walls remained to indicate such a system existed.