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International Workshop on: Towards Socially Just and Sustainable Fisheries: ICSF Workshop on Implementing the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines)
  • :2014
  • :98
  • :978 93 80802 33 6
Abstract

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON

Towards Socially Just and Sustainable Fisheries: ICSF Workshop on Implementing
the FAO Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries
in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines)

Report

This publication is a report of the proceedings of the ICSF Pondy Workshop, which focused on the FAO’s Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines). The workshop brought together 71 participants from 20 countries representing civil society organizations, governments, FAO, academia and fishworker organizations from both the marine and inland fisheries sectors.

This report will be found useful for fishworker organizations, researchers, policymakers, members of civil society and anyone interested in small-scale fisheries, food security and poverty eradication.

Developing a Transformative Agenda towards Socially Just and Sustainable Fisheries: Opportunities and Limitations of the SSF Guidelines

Presenter: Cornelie Quist

Moderators: Jackie Sunde and Vivienne Solis Rivera

Cornelie Quist, Member, ICSF, made a presentation on “Developing a Transformative Agenda towards Socially Just and Sustainable Fisheries: Opportunities and Limitations of the SSF Guidelines”. The presentation took the participants through what was understood by a transformative agenda, and outlined the opportunities and limitations of the SSF Guidelines in the context of gender relations and equality issues. Cornelie began with a definition that set the tone for the presentation:

A transformative agenda is guided by a vision of social justice and human rights. It is based on the fundamental understanding of social inequality as the root cause of poverty and unsustainable development and on the importance of social change.

It supports the human-rights approach to development, which incorporates the acceptance of equal and inalienable rights of all men and women to be able to make strategic life choices for their own well-being.

It acknowledges people as agents of social change.

Power relations, Cornelie said, were constructed by people—and, therefor